Thursday, September 22, 2011

Umm...I've been a little busy.

As you can see, life went a little insane this summer...what with the operation and recovery and new job and the new husband and the NEW WONDERFUL LIFE with the man of my dreams. Guess you can say I took my dad's advice (see last blog post...the one from Father's Day back in JUNE)...

in which he said..."Take time to love and be loved."

Sunday, June 19, 2011

Happy Father's Day...to a star that still burns.


Many years ago, my dad flipped over a paper placemat in a restaurant and wrote me a letter on the back. I won't share all of it because it is personal, but the following words tell a lot about the patriarch of the family.


"You were a perfect baby, 
a terrible teen, a promising star, 
blossoming out beyond braided hair
and your 'very own' bedroom.

...You have become better. May I say that to you, with grace? Your impatience has mellowed, and so has mine. Mutual treasure.

Your star is burning ever brighter,
while ours is burning out.
That is the way of stars, you know.

...My advice is free, but valuable.
Don't be hung up with other's success.

...Rejoice in the small things.
Take time for laughter, and so-called 'little' 
people. Take time to love & be loved.

Your Dad"


Recently, I read a line in Ann Voskamp's One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are that froze me in place and instantly made me think of my dad. She quoted Martin Luther, who once said: "If you want to change the world, pick up your pen."

Dad, as you end your career...your years of study and preparation and sermons and planning and elders' meetings and work parties and moves and marriage ceremonies and youth rallies and funerals...let me be the first in line to thank you. Thank you for leading us on adventures in New England and Pennsylvania and Texas...for canoes and cameras and shotguns...for hikes and hunts and museums and darkrooms that smelled like vinegar.

For loving our mother.
  
For picking up your pen and changing the world. 
 
Dad, with his own dad. (1947)

Thursday, June 02, 2011

Thumbs up, everybody! ROCK AND ROLL!

Feelin' a little down after yesterday's exam and hospital pre-op visit. The surgery will be worse than we thought, the recovery longer, the side effects more awful. Lunch with the Schumanns cheered me up a little bit (I had to rip the bandage off my arm so I could dip my chips in the salsa!), but then my AC broke last night and water was dripping into the utility room closet...on the same wood that got soaked during the Water Heater Fiasco a couple of months ago!

And then, today, the good news started rolling in to soften yesterday's blows. Philip fixed the AC. Good news on the phone from my boss. A funny photo of Kirsten's AHS bear headed back to Arizona.

And then...this.





Thumbs up, everybody.

Saturday, May 28, 2011

Mothers LOVE us...

...love us like a ROCK!



Thanks to Bethany for the cute mama cat hug link!


And thanks to Kester Smith for the Paul Simon link!

Friday, May 27, 2011

Remember how I said life had become insane?

I had no idea how crazy it could get. None. NO ONE COULD HAVE IMAGINED. 


Harvest hit at the EXACT SAME MOMENT that my job decided to explode with activities and deadlines and field trips and permission slips and awards and number crunching and did-I-mention-the-oh-so-many MEETINGS?


Well, in all this craziness, we had two Madison "Bison Babe" get-togethers, and this voicemail received after one of them will make you realize how awesome Sweet Philip is...


Sitting in my office, enjoying the roses Philip sent me on the last day of school and wearing the sweet Conan shirt Karla Meador gave me (BECAUSE SHE IS THE BEST!!) with a fresh delivery of Edmundo & Emilia's world-famous tamales to take home...

...grinning from ear to ear.

Sunday, May 08, 2011

Life, as we know it, has come to a grinding halt.

Life has been pretty insane lately...even more than usual...as AISD librarians prepare for our new roles/campuses. It's been one deadline, MEETING, crisis, budget problem, MEETING, celebration, urgent email, bus request, phone call, MEETING, class, equipment problem, project, and MEETING after another these days...with all indications that it's going to get worse instead of better as we finish out May.

And then on top of that, HARVEST started today for Philip. We know we won't see each other much for the next month...which is a bummer, but on the other hand, maybe it's LUCKY that our calendars get crazy at the same time. We would feel guilty ignoring the other person if just one of us were constantly engaged in business...but since we're both covered up, we're just grateful to have the time to work on our individual projects!

Here's what Madison did on Friday:
http://www.ktxs.com/abilene_news/27807984/detail.html

And what we did on Saturday:
http://www.ktxs.com/abilene_news/27814343/detail.html

This Wednesday is the Lone Star luncheon, generously underwritten by Senter, Realtors and CBS Insurance. (After that, Kirsten and I may be able to catch our breath a little...before we begin packing up to leave Madison after all these years.) Gulp. Sniffle.

Oh, and poor Philip. Here's the first harvest cell phone video he sent me, probably the first of many over the next month!

video

Oh, and as crazy as life gets...I'll still try to keep Flickr updated...because I love it. This article confirms my Flickr addiction is healthy. (Oh, and while you're at the Wired site, you may as well enjoy THIS.)

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

The conference was great, but...

...the weekend with Philip, Angela, Troy, Falisha, and Bethany was even better. Photos and story to come as soon as life settles down a bit.

This clever Passover video was featured on a friend's blog (thanks, Heather).

Wednesday, April 06, 2011

This is what happens...

...when i go to the store without a list.


I went to HEB for milk. Milk. One item. (I left with wine, flowers, jalapeno chips, habanero cheese, and a bunch of other stuff...)

The same thing happened two Saturdays ago when I went to Hastings for Where the Wild Things Are for Colten's birthday. After buying him the book and a Matchbox kit of vehicles (with a farm theme! how cool is that?!),  the sale racks sang their siren song, and I left with:

Audiobooks!
 *3 for $2.99 each from the clearance rack (Angels in the Gloom, No Graves As Yet, and Kay Bailey Hutchison's Leading Ladies)

Books!
*Revenge of the Paste Eaters: Memoirs of a Misfit
*Sleeping Arrangements
*a biography of Thomas Merton
*Shaggy Muses: The Dogs Who Inspired Virginia Woolf, Emily Dickinson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Edith Wharton, and Emily Bronte
*The Wind in the Willows

DVDs!
*Zombieland
*Willow
*SNL: The Best of Jimmy Fallon
*Bandits
*Jim Carrey's A Christmas Carol
and
*Date Night

I don't have a smart phone so there was no checking of reviews. Who knows if they're any good? (So far, I *hate* Angels in the Gloom...bleah! And it's NOT the narrator I despise. What's up with all the EMOTION that is painstakingly, excruciatingly explained to the reader? Seriously! Just make the dialogue convincing, make your characters layered and genuine...and let the reader sort it out for herself). 

It's not very often I quit an audiobook, but this one's fixin' to get the boot if it doesn't improve pronto! 

Hopeful that the rest will be winners,
Kristy


  video

Monday, April 04, 2011

Puzzle people!

Didja' miss the NPR puzzle yesterday? Need your Will Shortz fix? Read on, puzzle enthusiasts, because it was my week to transcribe the puzzle. :-)

********

Synopsis of
NPR Weekend Edition puzzle
David Greene and Will Shortz

2011-04-03



The Current Challenge (given 20110327):


http://www.npr.org/2011/03/27/134888910/a-step-in-the-right-direction
From puzzle writer Francis Heaney: Take the word "calm" and flip the letters A and L to get "clam." Take the last name of a film director known for using profanity, and flip two pairs of letters in place to get a word used as a substitute for profanity. Who's the director, and what's the word?


The answers were TARANTINO and TARNATION. David played a brief clip from a Tarantino movie (the famous "Royale with cheese" conversation) and asked Will if he could name the movie. Will could not come up with the title _Pulp Fiction_ and confessed he was not a fan of profanity.


The on-air players today, randomly drawn from more than 2,500 correct answers, were Jaxon and Arlene Teck of Rockaway, New Jersey. David asked this "package deal" what they did for living; Arlene replied that she writes brand names for pharmaceutical products, and Jaxon is a logistics planner. They've been playing since the postcard days. Jaxon confessed that "it's primarily Arlene who does the submitting...I just sort of watch as it goes by." David joked that Arlene does "the heavy lifting," and Jaxon agreed. Jaxon & Arlene listen to NPR on member station WNYC (FM 93.9).


Will welcomed Arlene and Jaxon, saying that today's challenge "is a good puzzle for two people." Every answer today was a familiar proverb or saying containing a word that starts with the letter T. Will gave David, Arlene, and Jaxon the T word, and they were to come up with the saying. (Some of the words had multiple correct proverbs/sayings, but Will assured them that any familiar answer "would be counted correct.") For example, if Will said TRY, the answer might be a saying like "If at first you don't succeed--try, try again."


CLUES (hints below clues; answers at the end of this synopsis):




1. THOUSAND




2. THROW




3. TURN

 4. TREAD






5. TALES




6. TWICE




7. TIME




8. THINK






HINTS:

2. The first word is "people."



3. Will said, "It's got to be a proverb or saying, though, rather than just an expression."




4. Will's answer starts with "fools."

 6. There are several possibilities, but one of them starts with the word "measure."




8. Will says, "This is so appropriate for today. Your first word is 'great.' "




* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *
The listener challenge for next week:


From http://www.npr.org/2011/04/03/135076213/try-one-on-for-size :


Assign every letter of the alphabet a numerical value: A=1, B=2, C=3 and so forth. Think of a classic work of literature that has eight letters in its title. When the letters are given a numerical value, they add up to 35. What's the title? Clue: The title has two words.




Answers must be received by 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time on THURSDAY. One entry per person.


NPR will no longer receive entries by email.


Be sure to include a telephone number where you can be reached if you are selected as the winner.


Entries may be made at the web page:


http://www.npr.org/templates/contact/index.php?columnId=4473090


You might also get to this page by going to:


http://npr.org/puzzle


* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *


Guest editor's notes from Kristy:


It's the first Sunday of the month, and that means it's my turn to type up the puzzle synopsis. HOORAY!




Serendipitous links for today:



David Greene's NPR biography page:


http://www.npr.org/people/4510160/david-greene




The Japan/Haiti photojournalism project from today's _Weekend Edition Sunday_ (audio available after 12 p.m. Eastern):


http://n.pr/fzPqT2

 ONLY for fans of Rebecca Black or Stephen Colbert:


http://n.pr/i8OkRh






* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *


Editor's notes:

Puzzles, and contents of Weekend Edition/Sunday puzzle segment are copyrighted 2010, by Will Shortz and NPR. Reprinted here with permission.






Here's our regular monthly puzzle transcription schedule:


1st Kristy


2nd Richard


3rd Joe


4th Jerry


5th Richard








* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *


MAILBAG:





No mail.







* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *






Our group of volunteer co-editors distributes these free weekly synopses of the NPR puzzle segment. You can read more about this free distribution at:


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You can subscribe from this page, too.






To unsubscribe from this group, send email to:


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or, for more information about the Topica mailing service, visit:


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NPR posts the weekly challenge (and the previous answer) on its World Wide Web page. Go to www.npr.org, and "select" Weekend Edition Sunday from the drop-down combo box to the right of the big npr in the top left corner. You can also pick up a recording of Weekend Edition Sunday program in the Real Audio format, after 1:00 p.m. Eastern time each Sunday. In the alternative, for the text of the weekly listener challenge and a photo of Will, you can go directly to:


http://www.npr.org/programs/wesun/puzzle/


Podcasts are available at:


http://www.npr.org/podcasts/










From:


http://www.npr.org/rss/podcast.php?id=4473090&uid=3ba205bf25adca5af473ab1102e03b75


How do I subscribe to this podcast?


Copy the URL [above this paragraph] into your preferred podcasting tool software (e.g. Odeo, iTunes, iPodder).


You will automatically receive this podcast each time it's published.






Follow Liane on Twitter: http://twitter.com/nprLiane






Links of interest:


Merl Reagle’s article on constructing crossword puzzles, available at:


http://www.crosswordtournament.com/articles/inq031697.htm


World Puzzle Federation:


http://www.worldpuzzle.org


More of Ed Pegg Jr.'s puzzles are available at:


http://www.mathpuzzle.com


Joe Wander suggests:


http://www.wordsmith.org/awad


You can join Kathie Schneider's email list for accessible word and logic puzzles. To subscribe, send a blank email to:


blind-puzzle-@googlegroups.com


For Team USA of the World Puzzle Federation:


http://wpc.puzzles.com/














* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *






CLUES & ANSWERS:














1. THOUSAND


("A picture is worth a thousand words.")










2. THROW


("People who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.")










3. TURN


("One good turn deserves another.")










4. TREAD


(Will's answer: "Fools rush in where angels fear to tread." Jaxon's answer: "Tread softly, but carry a big stick.")










5. TALES


("Dead men tell no tales.")










6. TWICE


("Measure twice; cut once." "Once bitten, twice shy." "Lightning never strikes twice in the same spot." "Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me.")










7. TIME


("A stitch in time saves nine." "Time will tell." "Time heals all wounds.")










8. THINK


("Great minds think alike.")














End of NPR Puzzle Synopsis.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Yes. You ARE seeing that.

Mmm hmm. Temperatures in the thirties and nineties in the same week.
And no one thinks it's weird.

Monday, March 21, 2011

Mary Oliver! Mary Oliver! MARY-PULITZER-PRIZE-OLIVER!!!

Remember a little over a year ago, when I wrote that I was ROBBED because I didn't know about the poet Mary Oliver until I was 46 years old? An ENGLISH major, for cryin' out loud, who didn't know about Mary Oliver? (Note to self: Ask ACU for a partial refund.)
http://corpuskristy.blogspot.com/2010/03/robbed.html

Well, anyway, the EXTREMELY PRIVATE Mary Oliver opens up to Maria Shriver in this month's O: The Oprah Magazine. (Side note: I have never seen Oprah's tv show. Never. Not even once. Rest assured...I am NOT from the Cult of O.) :-)
http://www.oprah.com/entertainment/Maria-Shriver-Interviews-Poet-Mary-Oliver

That's all. Less important things than poetry...like the details of my life and stuff...can wait until later.

Poetry comes FIRST.


UPDATE: For a behind-the-scenes look at the Shriver/Oliver interview, visit:
http://www.oprah.com/spirit/Maria-Shriver-Interview-Poet-Mary-Oliver-O-Magazine-Poetry-Issue

Sunday, March 06, 2011

Didja' miss the Sunday Puzzle?

I may not have time to blog recent fun adventures (school, work, taking care of Philip after he had a little outpatient surgery on President's Day, feeding cattle on his farm, taking pics of Julie in the park, etc.), but I *make* time to type up the NPR puzzle with Will Shortz once a month. 

Today it was my turn so stretch your brain below!

* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *

Synopsis of
NPR Weekend Edition puzzle
Lynn Neary and Will Shortz
2011-03-06
 
 
The Current Challenge (given 20110227):
From Merl Reagle: Take a common girl's name that's six letters long. Change the fourth letter to the next letter in the alphabet to get another common girl's name. What names are these? 
 
 
The answers were MARSHA and MARTHA. Lynn said "You know, that seems simple when you see it--like you would get it right away...but I doubt I would have if I had tried. But we DID receive more than 1,400 entries this week." 
 
 
The on-air player today, randomly drawn from those sending in the correct answer, was John LePeau, a retired computer programmer, from Iowa City, Iowa. John says it took 10-15 minutes to solve the puzzle. He found a list of women's names, limited them to 6-letter names, and eventually found MARSHA and MARTHA. Mr. LePeau has been playing since the postcard days; he is a member of Iowa Public Radio and listens to WSEY and KSEY.
 
 
Will invited John and Lynn to play a game where they would put on HATS. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase, in which the first word starts with HA, and the second word starts with T. For example, if Will gave the clue "a brand of tanning lotion," the answer would be HAWAIIAN TROPIC
 
 
CLUES (hints below clues; answers at the end of this synopsis):
 
 
1.   The President who said, "The buck stops here."
 
 
2.  It may hang over a rod, next to a sink
 
 
3.  Skimpy article of apparel for women
 
 
4.  Part of a mountain road where it doubles back on itself
 
 
5.  Olympic event that involves a 16-pound metal ball attached to a wire 
 
 
6.  To perform a difficult surfing maneuver 
 
 
7.  Traditional luxury wool cloth for sports jackets 
 
 
8.  Period in autumn when crops are brought in 
 
 
9.  If you constantly razz somebody, you're giving them a what? 
 
 
10. Theme song for Roy Rogers & Dale Evans 
 
 
11. Statement that isn't a lie, but also doesn't tell the whole story 
 
 
12. Responding to the slightest provocation, as a temper 
 
 
13. G.I. Joe, Mr. Potato Head, and Lincoln Logs
 
 
14.. Female Abolitionist who helped run the Underground Railroad
 
  
HINTS:
 
3. "It would be worn above the waist."   
"The T is--what's the opposite of BOTTOM?"   
"Lynn, I'm guessing you're not wearing this now."
 
 
7. Nice material for a man's sports jacket
 
 
* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *
 
The listener challenge for next week:
Think of a two-word phrase that means a time long ago. Move the third, fourth and fifth letters to the end of the phrase, without rearranging those three letters, to get a new two-word phrase that means the beginning. What phrases are these?
 
 
 
Answers must be received by 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time on THURSDAY.  One entry per person.
NPR will no longer receive entries by email. 
Be sure to include a telephone number where you can be reached if you are selected as the winner. 
Entries may be made at the web page:
You might also get to this page by going to:
 
 
* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *
 
Guest editor's notes from Kristy:
 
It's the first Sunday of the month, and that means it's my turn to type up the puzzle synopsis. HOORAY!
 
 
Serendipitous links for today:
 
The Iditarod begins TODAY!
 
Lynn Neary's NPR bio:
 
 
And two stories that have NOTHING to do with Charlie Sheen. (You're welcome!):
 
http://bit.ly/f3rfdf  (Loved the video.)
 
http://abcn.ws/ikmOG9  Super Granny!
 
 
* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *
 
Editor's notes:
 
Puzzles, and contents of Weekend Edition/Sunday puzzle segment are copyrighted 2010, by Will Shortz and NPR. Reprinted here with permission.
 
Here's our regular monthly puzzle transcription schedule:
1st       Kristy
2nd      Richard
3rd       Joe
4th       Jerry
5th       Richard
 
 
Email us at:
Kristy Fowler gmail.com>
Richard Renner igc.org>
Jerry Miller muohio.edu>
Joe Wander gmail.com>
 
 
So email for next week's synopsis goes to Richard Renner at igc.org> .
 
 
* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *
MAILBAG:
 
If you've been racking your brain this week, trying to solve Jerry's challenge from last week (10 3-letter body parts), you'll be 
glad to read the exchange below.
 
Joe Wander <jdwandersr@gmail.com> Sun, Feb 27, 2011 at 5:42 PM
jaw
eye
ear
arm
leg
toe
lid
pit
lip
rib
gut
lat
abs
maw
acl
tmj
 
***

On Sun, Feb 27, 2011 at 6:16 PM, Jerry Miller <jerry.miller@muohio.edu> wrote:
pit: arm pit
lid: eye lid
gut: hmmmm.... I have never accepted that one
lat: abbreviation
abs: same thing
maw: another word for stomach
acl: acronym
tmj: acronym

I am looking for two others.

:)
- Hide quoted text -

 
***
 
Richard Renner <rrenner@igc.org> Sun, Feb 27, 2011 at 6:21 PM

Reply-To: rrenner@igc.org
To: Kristy Fowler Joe Wander <jdwandersr@gmail.com>
Cc: Jerry Miller <Jerry.Miller@muohio.edu>
Attached are two of my files listing body parts.

Richard Renner
Kohn, Kohn & Colapinto, LLP
3233 P St., NW
Washington, DC  20007
202-342-6980, Ext. 112
202-342-6984 FAX
***
Jerry Miller <jerry.miller@muohio.edu> Sun, Feb 27, 2011 at 6:25 PM

Cc: Kristy Fowler  Joe Wander <jdwandersr@gmail.com>
ok, ok...

I wanted to challenge everyone to think. :)


J
***
 
oe Wander <jdwandersr@gmail.com> Sun, Feb 27, 2011 at 7:02 PM

To: Jerry Miller <jerry.miller@muohio.edu>
Cc: Kristy Fowler
Nothing like a rock drill (remember the story about the 'tis bottle?"

How about hip and gum, on the assumption that bum and ass are too colloquial? joe
***
 
Jerry Miller <jerry.miller@muohio.edu> Sun, Feb 27, 2011 at 7:25 PM
To: Joe Wander <jdwandersr@gmail.com>
You got them!

Jerry Miller

Sent from my Sprint HTC EVO.
 
***And for the complete list in one place--here's what Jerry emailed after the synopsis last Sunday morning!***
 
 
Jerry Miller <jerry.miller@muohio.edu> Sun, Feb 27, 2011 at 9:18 AM
To: Kristy Fowler
Kristy,

Here are the answers for the puzzle I gave at the end of the synopsis:

The five easier ones:
1. arm
2. ear
3. eye
4. leg
5. toe

The five more difficult ones:
1. gum
2. hip
3. jaw
4. lip
5. rib (internal)


Jerry
  ***
 
Huzzah for MAIL!
 
* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *
 
Our group of volunteer co-editors distributes these free weekly synopses of the NPR puzzle segment.  You can read more about this free distribution at:
You can subscribe from this page, too.
 
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to:
 
For more options, visit this group at:
 
If you want to remove your address from the former Topica list, send a blank email from your account to:
 
To change the email address of your subscription, remove the old one (from the old email account), and add the new Google subscription (from the new email account).  For more information about this list, and an archive of those distributed by Topica.com, visit:
or, for more information about the Topica mailing service, visit:
 
NPR posts the weekly challenge (and the previous answer) on its World Wide Web page.  Go to www.npr.org, and "select" Weekend Edition Sunday from the drop-down combo box to the right of the big npr in the top left corner.  You can also pick up a recording of Weekend Edition Sunday program in the Real Audio format, after 1:00 p.m. Eastern time each Sunday.  In the alternative, for the text of the weekly listener challenge and a photo of Will, you can go directly to: 
Podcasts are available at:
 
From:
How do I subscribe to this podcast?
Copy the URL [above this paragraph] into your preferred podcasting tool software (e.g. Odeo, iTunes, iPodder).
You will automatically receive this podcast each time it's published.
 
Follow Liane on Twitter: http://twitter.com/nprLiane
 
Links of interest:
Merl Reagle’s article on constructing crossword puzzles, available at:
World Puzzle Federation:
More of Ed Pegg Jr.'s puzzles are available at:
Joe Wander suggests:
You can join Kathie Schneider's email list for accessible word and logic puzzles. To subscribe, send a blank email to:
For Team USA of the World Puzzle Federation:
 
 
 
* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *
 
CLUES & ANSWERS:
 
 
 
1.   The President who said, "The buck stops here."   HARRY TRUMAN
 
 
2.  It may hang over a rod, next to a sink  HAND TOWEL
 
 
3.  Skimpy article of apparel for women   HALTER TOP
 
 
4.  Part of a mountain road where it doubles back on itself   HAIRPIN TURN
 
 
5.  Olympic event that involves a 16-pound metal ball attached to a wire HAMMER THROW
 
 
6.  To perform a difficult surfing maneuver   HANG TEN
 
 
7.  Traditional luxury wool cloth for sports jackets   HARRIS TWEED
 
 
8.  Period in autumn when crops are brought in   HARVEST TIME
 
 
9.  If you constantly razz somebody, you're giving them a what?   HARD TIME
 
 
10. Theme song for Roy Rogers & Dale Evans  "HAPPY TRAILS"
 
 
11. Statement that isn't a lie, but also doesn't tell the whole story   HALF-TRUTH
 
 
12. Responding to the slightest provocation, as a temper   HAIR TRIGGER
 
 
13. G.I. Joe, Mr. Potato Head, and Lincoln Logs  HASBRO TOYS
 
 
14.. Female Abolitionist who helped run the Underground Railroad  HARRIET TUBMAN
 
 
 
 
End of NPR Puzzle Synopsis.
 
* ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *
Happy Puzzling! Don't forget to submit your answer before Thursday so YOU can play the puzzle on the air with my next ex-husband, Will Shortz!